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This recipe is from the book Farmstead Chef.  My mom made it for her neighbors.  She thought it was good, and would make it again, but she said it would be even better with bacon crumbled into it too to give it a stronger flavor.  Our CSA member Lynn is one of the aforementioned neighbors, and she liked it so much she asked that I post it here.

I admit, before retyping it from the book, I googled it and found it already typed up here.  (I borrowed their picture too.)

Warm Zucchini Dip from the Farmstead Chef cookbook

Ingredients
  • 2 cups fresh zucchini (or any summer squash), shredded
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 1/2 cup plain yogurt
  • 1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese (or any hard granular cheese)
  • 1/4 cup bell peppers, finely chopped (I used a mixture of orange, red and yellow)
  • 4 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon canola oil or non-stick spray for preparing the pan
  • Pita chips and sliced raw vegetables for dipping (such as carrots, cauliflower, peppers, rutabaga, kohlrabi, cucumbers, Hakurei turnips, or even blanched green beans).
Directions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.
  2. Toss the zucchini and the salt in a large bowl. Let sit for an hour to extract the water from the zucchini. (There will be a lot of water.)
  3. Drain the zucchini and press out any excess water.
  4. Mix the mayonnaise, yogurt, cheese, peppers, green onions, garlic and Worcestershire sauce until well combined.
  5. Prepare an 8-inch baking dish by lightly oiling it with canola oil or coating with non-stick spray.
  6. Spread the dip evenly into the prepared pan and bake for 15 to 20 minutes at 375 degrees, or until bubbly.
    Serve hot with pita chips and a variety of fresh, raw vegetables for dipping.
YIELD: 8 appetizer servings.
Here’s a recipe that some kid gardeners made me — it was delicious and offered a different taste family than the usual Minnesota quick marinated cucumbers.  The recipe is originally from Martha Stewart.
The longer the cucumbers have to soak up the flavors of the marinade the more delicious they will be.

Photo courtesy of Martha Stewart’s website.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
  • 3 Israeli or Kirby cucumbers, peeled and thinly sliced (about 2 cups)
  • 1 scallion, white and light green parts, thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed and peeled

Directions

  1. In a shallow dish whisk together the soy sauce, vinegar, sesame oil, salt, and cayenne. Add the cucumber, scallion, and garlic. Stir to combine. Press down and spread out cucumbers in dish. Cover and refrigerate for at least one hour but up to 2 days.

In your box this week:

  1. LAST OF:  Tomatoes
  2. LAST OF:  Potatoes
  3. LAST OF:  Cilantro
  4. LAST OF:  Basil
  5. Mint
  6. Thyme
  7. Fennel
  8. NEW!  Sage
  9. NEW!  Onion Chives
  10. NEW!  Parsley
  11. Kale
  12. Beans
  13. Cucumbers (LAST OF??)
  14. Zucchini / Summer Squash (LAST OF??)
  15. Carrots
  16. Arugula
  17. Peppers:  All of them this week are sweet EXCEPT the long skinny green Cayenne Hot Pepper

.

HERB CONFUSION??  We can help!

From Left to Right:

  1. Basil: Fresh, dried, frozen (chop in food processor first).  Use in pesto, Italian dishes, sauces, soups.
  2. Onion Chives: Best used fresh.  Chop up fresh as garnish for salad, potatoes, or tacos, etc.  Can also be used cooked.
  3. Mint: Fresh, dried, frozen.  Mint calms an upset stomach.  Dry it and then crumble it into a jar for later use.  Last winter I had food poisoning and mint tea helped A LOT.  I went through almost a quart of dried mint leaves in a week, and was SO GLAD I had them on hand in the cupboard.
  4. Thyme: Fresh or dried.  Usually used cooked, such as in Italian dishes, hotdishes, and soups.
  5. Cilantro: Best fresh, could probably be dried?  Use it fresh in salsa, spring rolls, quesadillas, with fruit, in cornbread, or as a last second addition to sautes or soups.  Cilantro also makes a great pesto!
  6. Parsley: Fresh, dried, frozen.  Another good pesto candidate!  Also used in Italian dishes, soups, sprinkled in salads (try it!), or just generally added to pretty much anything.
  7. Sage: Fresh, dried, frozen.  Use it in fall cooking, like with squash soup, potato dishes, and meat things.

FRESH:  Keep fresh by putting it in a plastic bag in the fridge.  Basil is picky–wet leaves turn black in the fridge.  Sometimes it works well to put basil in a vase on your counter.  Or put a towel around it in the bag to catch condensation.

DRIED:  Just hang the bunch upside down in a place that gets some air movement but that is out of direct sunlight.  Stagnant air could facilitate molding, and the sun zaps nutrition and flavor.  If you are like me, you always think, “Of course I will remember what herb this is!” but then when it is all dried up it is hard to tell if it was Oregano or Mint or Parsley or what.  So just LABEL IT now and thank yourself later.

FROZEN:  I have found it easiest to chop up the dry herb with a food processor, and then put in a bag in the freezer.  No water or oil mixed in means the herbs stay crumbly and I can just scoop out however much I want.  The super deluxe way of preventing them from clumping up would be to pour the ground-up herbs onto a piece of wax paper on a cookie sheet and freeze them flat, and then pour them into a plastic bag after they are frozen.  Some people like to freeze them as pesto, or in oil or water, perhaps in an ice cube tray, and then transfer the frozen herb cubes into a plastic bag.

CSA member Amy found this recipe and loved it!  It’s super tasty, and thanks to the Bok Choy it is packed with loads of calcium, iron, and vitamins A & C.

Due to copyright issues for this one we can provide the link but not reprint it.  The recipe also includes chives/green onions, ramen noodles, and wasabi peas.

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